Published October 9th, 2014

Low fat, and low calorie Subway sandwich options are on the menu, so a healthy macro nutrient ratio can be catered for—except if you’re Paleo, or off grains. In that case, Subway is not for your diet plan. What about micro nutrients though? Can a healthy balanced diet be maintained with most calories coming from Subs?

Why does healthy eating matter?

The question almost doesn’t need to be asked. Longevity, energy, vitality, happiness and well being sum it up in general terms. Eat well, and you’ll feel well. Take care of your body, and you’ll give yourself the best chance to live a long and happy life.

The physical shape of the body can be manipulate with macro nutrient changes. For example, low carb, and high fat, or high protein diets—like the Paleo or Ketogenic diets—have helped people quickly lose body fat. A fit looking person, isn’t necessarily a healthy person though, they could easily be heavy alcohol drinkers, fast food lovers, or smokers.

Meeting our body’s micro nutritional needs provides the best conditions for mental performance—for example if you want to learn Slovenian online. Slovenian is a challenging language to pick up. Or if you want to pass university exams. Or just challenge your mind and mentally grow, it’s vital we fill in nutritional holes.

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Evaluating Subway micro nutrients

Looking at the official Subway nutritional information sheet, a few vitamins and minerals appear in respectable portions. Namely, vitamin A, C, and minerals Iron and Calcium.

The vitamins are likely from vegetables that can be added to a sub, so load up on as much as you can when enjoying a sandwich. Ingredients are not organic however, and non organic veggies are widely considered to be low in vitamin and mineral quantity and quality.

This was only a quick look at Subway nutritional info. My conclusion is that Subs do have micro nutritional value, but it’s not the ideal source. So eating Subway occasionally as part of a healthy balanced diet is recommended, and eating a mostly Subway diet is probably not the best idea.

Published October 4th, 2014

Ian Thomson [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Ian Thomson [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Can Subway be healthy? Can you perform optimally, physically and mentally on a diet of mostly Subway sandwiches? Jared Fogle thinks so, and has done his best to prove it. Jared was incredibly overweight at 192kg, and created the ‘Subway Diet’ to help him lose weight. He lost an amazingly impressive 111kg.

How did he manage it? Jared limited his calorie intake to a couple of low fat Subway sandwiches a day. After loosing some weight he started walking to school, and made his exercise program a daily walk. References also say he supplemented with a multi vitamin.

Optimal diet, or just effective for fat loss

Jared lost an impressive amount weight with the diet, and was undoubtedly healthier as a result. However long term is the Subway Diet ideal for health? Probably not. Generally whole foods, a good variety of fresh fruits and veggies are recommended in a balanced healthy diet. Natural supplements, like Alpha Brain, a cognitive enhancer consisting of only earth grown nutrients, claim to fill in nutritional holes and really optimise the mind for performance.

Despite that, better to find a diet that improves your health, that you stick with, than the ‘perfect’ diet that you never put into action.

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Published June 30th, 2014

Supplements

Supplements won’t negate the bad effects of overindulging in fast food. Supplements are just that, supplements. They can be useful in supplementing and optimising a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables—with the occasionally Subway treat. ;)

Here are a few supplements I take regularly, with reasons why for each. I’m not a doctor, so these are just recommendations for the items I find beneficial, and which you might too. I suggest doing your own additional research into the pros and cons of any supplement before adding one to your diet.

1. Fish Oil (Omega 3)

Omega 3 is well known for it’s positive health effects. I lift weights a few times a week and take fish oil to support the wear and tear on my joints. When purchasing fish oil, make sure to check the omega 3 content. Code liver oil often contains zero omega 3, as do some other fish oil mixes, meaning they’re most likely void of the nutritional benefit you’re looking for.

2. Multivitamin

A good quality multivitamin, from natural ingredients is a nice solution for plugging nutritional holes. I eat vegetables with every meal, and fruit with most, and supplement with a multivitamin once a day to make sure my bases are covered

3. Greens Powder

A greens supplement is very handy for times when you’re eating in a hurry and don’t have time to prepare vegetables. I really notice the effects on my digestion between meals which include vegetables, and those that don’t. A greens supplement can be mixed up in a shake quickly to make sure you’re getting your ‘greens’ when you’re in a hurry.

4. Alpha Brain

Alpha Brain is a nootropic, or cognitive enhancer from Onnit.com. It’s made from earth-grown nutrients mixed to optimise mental performance and alertness. A cool reported side effect is that Alpha Brain increased the chances of lucid dreaming occurring.

5. Creatine

Creatine is one of the most researched sports supplements. Although is has a controversial reputation, positive effects have been shown of creatine helping to prevent degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. I take creatine to support my strength training.

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